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Many of the photos and documents in the Korean War sections courtesy of
Eddie C. Bateson


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The military struggle fought on the Korean Peninsula from June 1950, to July 1953, begun between South Korea (Republic of Korea) and North Korea (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), and rapidly developed into a limited international war, decreed by the United Nations as a “police action”; lasting for 37-months involving the United States and 22 nations, and claimed millions of lives. America suffered 157,530 casualties; deaths from all causes totaled 33,629 of which 23,300 occurred in combat. South Korea sustained 1,312,836 military casualties, including 415,004 dead; casualties among other UN allies totaled 16,532, including 3,094 dead. Estimated Communist casualties were 2,000,000. Given this legacy, what is most surprising about the Korean War is that it has been so completely forgotten.

The MANSFIELD, under the command of Cmdr. E.H. Headland, Jr. in company with DeHaven, Collett and Lyman K. Swenson, played significant roles during the war. Commander Destroyer Squadron Nine, Capt. H.C. Allen, Jr. was embarked on the MANSFIELD.

American naval strength in the Far East at the time was approximately one-fifth of the total, although roughly a third of the total force was operating in the Pacific. Vice-Admiral C. Turner Joy’s, Far East Command consisted of the cruiser Juneau, the destroyers Mansfield, DeHaven, Collett and Swenson, three mine-sweepers and five amphibious vessels. The Seventh Fleet consisted of the carrier Valley Forge, the cruiser Rochester, eight destroyers, an oiler and three submarines – fourteen ships dignified by fleet status.

Fighting began on 25 June 1950, when the North Korean army, substantially equipped by the Soviet Union, invaded South Korea. North Korea was aided during the war by personnel and equipment from both Communist China and the Soviet Union.

Seoul, the South Korean capital, fell to the North on 28 June, three days after the war began. During July the UN forces retired to a perimeter defense line about 50 miles from Pusan, a leading seaport on the southeastern coast.

The “police action” was primarily a foot soldier’s slogging campaign. As the historian Dean C. Allard has observed, for the navy the “pattern of logistical support, gunfire and carrier air cover of the Allied ground troops, interdiction of enemy supply lines and blockade of the enemy coast” was established early and continued through the war.

A major highlight of naval activity was amphibious. Occurring at Inchon, a port city tucked behind a narrow channel and mud flats on the west coast of South Korea. the inspiration to stage an amphibious landing in that most unlikely location, where the tidal range exceeds 30 feet, came from the fertile imagination of General MacArthur. As had often been the case in World War II, Washington doubted the wisdom of the field commander, but Mac Arthur’s eloquence won over the army chief-of-staff and the chief of naval operations.

At dawn on 15 September 1950, from the command ship Mount McKinley, Mac Arthur watched the navy land a mixed amphibious group of Marines, Army soldiers, and Koran. The tides were right, and the powerful UN invasion caught the North Koran off guard. The MANSFIELD, a major support role player, was one of six destroyers selected for a reconnaissance in force of Inchon Harbor on 13 and 14 September, in advance of UN forces making an amphibious landing.

Most military historians agree, the invasion was just about the most telegraphed in military history. It was forecast by everyone from South Korean President Syngman Rhee to Lt. General Walton H. Walker of the Eight Army. Its target was tipped off weeks in advance by South Korean landings on eight islands screening the approaches to Inchon.

But what the invasion lacked in surprise it made up in muscle. The invasion fleet was the largest since Okinawa of World War II. It was a UN armada of 261 vessels; 194 American, 32 Japanese-leased American, 15 South Korean, 12 British, 3 Canadian, 2 Australian, 2 New Zealand, and 1 French.

Within ten days MacArthur’s men took Kimpo airfield, the largest in Korea, and reclaimed Seoul. the North Koreans surrounding the UN Forces at Pusan perimeter were now cut off and had to fight their way back north with heavy losses.

The following, in detail, give a full and complete account of MANSFIELD’s participation leading up to, and including the invasion of Inchon and the fateful events of her mining misfortune as recorded in her war diaries.

Puson Harbor
Puson Harbor

WAR DIARY

1. Designation of Unit: USS MANSFIELD (DD728) a unit of Destroyer Squadron NINE embarked in Mansfield with command pennant flying.

2. Designation of Operation Plan: Commander Support Group Naval Forces Far East (CTG 96.5) Operation Plan A-50, ComCruDiv-5 (CTG 96.5 Operation Plan 2-50.

3. Daily position, narrative, ammunition expenditures:

24 June 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan

25 June 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan. Report received of hostilities in Korea.

kwar0126 June 1950 – 0600 Underway in accordance with dispatch orders from Commander Naval Forces Far East for rendezvous with evacuation vessels of Inchon, Korea. Condition III watches set for war time cruising, Engineering plant separated for damage control. Speed: 25 knots.

27 June 1950 – Arrived off Inchon, Korea and met SS REINHOLT, evacuation ship. USS DEHAVEN (DD727) joined and was directed by Commander Destroyer Squadron 9 (COMDESRON 9) to escort SS REINHOLT to Japan. 1827 Met SS MARINE SNAPPER, second evacuation ship, and escorted out of inshore waters.

28 June 1950 – 1150 Arrived Sasebo, Japan for replenishment. 2027 Departed Sasebo, Japan for patrol station.

29 June 1950 – En route from Sasebo to patrol station on west coast of Korea. Investigated several sailing sampans.

kwar09 kwar06

kwar05South Koreans leaving the Mansfield after being hailed alongside for interrogation. A mission typical in the Yellow Sea in the early days of the Korean War. The two left with a supply of bread and rice, with many bows of appreciation on their departure.

30 June 1950 – Underway on patrol off the west coast of Korea. Rendezvous with USS LYMAN K. SWENSON (DD729). Expended in training practice 14 rounds of 5″ AAC, 54 rounds of 40MM, and 42 rounds of 20MM ammunition.

01 July 1950 – On patrol off west coast of Korea. 2130 Took aboard from two (2) sampans fourteen (14) Koreans, consisting of eight (8) soldiers of the South Korean army, 17th Infantry Regiment, four (4) civilian volunteers accompanying the soldiers and two (2) communist sympathizers captured by the soldiers.

02 July 1950 – On patrol off west coast of Korea.

03 July 1950 – On patrol off west coast of Korea. 2121 Relieved on station by HMS ALACRITY (PF).

kwar1104 July 1950 – En route from patrol station area to Sasebo, Japan. Transferred party of fourteen (14) Koreans to passing motor launch en route to MANSE DO island off south west Korea.

05 July 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan for replenishment.

06 July 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan for replenishment.

07 July 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan for replenishment.

08 July 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan. 0941 Underway for patrol of east coast of Korea.

09 July 1960 – 0600 with COMDESRON 9 aboard this vessel, relieved HMS JAMAICA (CL) on patrol station. USS SWENSON present in company on patrol station. 0700 USS JUNEAU (CIAA119) with Commander Task Group 96.5 (CTG 96.5), joined company.

kwar1210 July 1950 – Underway on patrol off east coast of Korea. USS JUNEAU and USS SWENSON in company. Approached and spoke to USS LST608, South Korean LST-BM660 and two (2) small South Korean patrol vessels, all bound for POHANG. Guided the two LSTs thru fog into harbor.

11 July 1950 – On patrol of east coast of Korea. Investigated coastal villages at shore line vicinity of OSAN. 0545 In company with USS JUNEAU and USS SWENSON bombarded SOKUSOKO and YANGYANG, North Korea. Expended 70 rounds 5″ AAC.

12 July 1950 – In company with USS JUNEAU at the direction of CTG 96.5, received demolition party of six Marines, six Naval enlisted, Marine officer, and one (1) Commander US Navy. The demolition party assembled in the MANSFIELD’s mess hall where they blackened their faces and did their final preparations for their task of planting explosives on the North-South main railroad line. Proceeded at high speed to coastline North Korea at Lat 40°30″N where at 0105 MANSFIELD approached with 1,000 yards of shore and put demolition party ashore. As the party approached land in the motor whale boat, the propeller was fouled with the anchor line and, while the party was able to be put ashore for their mission, the whale boat crew was left the task of clearing the propeller. Of the three MANSFIELD Petty Officers manning the boat, only Lon Franklin was later awarded the Bronze Star for participating in this action, which strongly suggests it was Franklin who did the diving to clear the propeller, thus enabling the party to safely return to the MANSFIELD after the raid. 0305 Demolition party completed planting charges in railroad tunnel and returned to ship. Ship rejoined JUNEAU at sea and proceeded south at high speed.

Received from Harold “Jonesy” Jones 6.10.01

crew03“I boarded Mansfield in April of ’50. I was BM3 in those days. Anyway, your description of event is pretty accurate as I recall, except for the tunnel incident. The way I remember it is as follows:”

“On the afternoon of, I believe, the 10th, Chief Windom, the ship’s CBM says, ‘Jonesy, we need you and your crew for a volunteer mission.’ No big deal, since I was assigned to the whale boat anyway. While I don’t recall numbers too well, I’ve always thought there were four Marines and four sailors. I took to be gunners mates as a demolition team, plus the Marine officer, a LT and a LTCMDR. off the cruiser Juneau. As I understood it, the Commander could talk the lingo (Korean). The boat crew was myself (cox’n), Chief Windom and a bow-hook (I can’t remember the name) and the engineer, who, as I recall, was Franklin.”

“We went in about 2AM or so and pitch dark but then, as I recall, there was some moon from somwhere. A whale boat, being double ended, is not a good landing craft in surf so we used a sea-anchor to keep us straight. At any rate, I let too much slack get into the anchor line and it tangled in the screw. It was my dumb ass what got wet and the Chief held me by the collar to keep my dumb ass from drowning. At any rate, we pulled it off without further probblems and returned to the ship. The four of us from the Mansfield got the bronze star with Combat V for the deal. About the others I have no knowledge, but I assume they did too, as it was them who did all the work. We were just transportation.”

“Any way, after Inchon and all the rest, we did OK til that mine in Sept (the 30th I think). We lost a piece of the bow (cut away) at Sassebo and a part of the crew was taken off to man some of those PFs we got back from Russia. At any rate, it was late Oct sometime when my stint on the Mansfield came to an end. I went to PF4 in Yokosuka, and back to Korea. But I always remember that ship as one lucky rascal, even though I probably worked harder while on board than I ever had to before or since on any other ship. In over 20 years Ive been on some good ships, but still the Mansfield stands out in my mind. I wasn’t a crew-member very long perhaps, but you can bet it was a busy few months and we had one hell of a crew.”

“‘Nuff said. Incidently, I made 2nd class on there too. So you see, the ship was good to me too.”

13 July 1950 – On patrol off east coast of Korea. 0215 fired four (4) rounds 5″ AAC at head lights on coast road. 1427 Relieved on station by USS DEHAVEN. Proceeding to Sasebo, Japan.

14 July 1950 – 0728 Arrived at Sasebo, Japan for replenishment. 2016 Departed Sasebo, Japan for patrol area.

15 July 1950 – On patrol off east coast of Korea. Transferred mail to USS DEHAVEN and USS JUNEAU. 2308 Bombarded road junction on (1) mile west of KOSONG. Lat 36°48’00” W, Long 129°27’30” E. Expended 12 rounds 5″ AAC.

16 July 1950 – On patrol off east coast of Korea. 0139 to 0302 Fired 8 rounds 5″ AAC at 3 separate headlight targets moving south along coast road CAMCHOK area. 0440 Commenced bombardment of road junction, vicinity of YONGHAE as directed by CTG 96.5. Expended 60 rounds 5″ AAC. 0932 Received mail from USS DEHAVEN and passed mail to USS JUNEAU. Received from USS JUNEAU one gunnery liaison officer, Major Bennett, US Army. 1518 t 1541 On call from US Army forces ashore, fired 48 rounds 5″ VT projectiles at assigned targets vicinity YONGDOK.

kwar1417 July 1950 – On patrol east coast of Korea. 0006 to 0405 On call from US Army forces ashore, fired 152 rounds 5″ AAC shells at targets designated in YONGDOK area. 1700 to 1725 On call from US Army, fired 82 rounds 5″ AAC on designated targets in YONGHAE area. Placed US Army artillery liaison officer ashore for conference with army forces in YONGDOK area, and recovered him 6 hours later. 2002 Rendezvous with HMS BELFAST (CA) and HMS COCKADE. COMDESRON 9 transferred to HMS BELFAST via small boat, for conference and return.

18 July 1950 – On patrol off east coast Korea. 0324 Bombarded YONGHAE area with 20 rounds 5″ AAC. 1021 Joined USS JUNEAU. Transferred mail to USS JUNEAU and USS DEHAVEN.

19 July 1950 – On patrol off east coast of Korea. Carried out two day fire mission in YONGDOK area on call from US Army forces ashore. Rounds expended 104 t” AAC shells. On sweep up coast road, fired 8 rounds 5″ AAC shells and 2 rounds illuminating shells at headlight targets moving south.

20 July 1950 – 0005 Fired 8 rounds 5′ AAC at headlight type target moving along coast. 0430 Commenced bombardment of YANGYANG area, fired 166 rounds 5″ AAC and 3 illuminating shells. Results not observed due to darkness. 0900 Returned to patrol area off YONGDOK. 1710 Received two officers from British cruiser HMS BELFAST and two American officers via high line from USS JUNEAU. 1824 Transferred visiting officers to South Korean patrol vessel for mission on the beach.

21 July 1950 – On patrol off east coast of Korea. Acting as screening vessel for USS JUNEAU and HMS BELFAST. On order from CTG 96.5 in USS JUNEAU proceeded to Pusan, Korea where anchored at 2011 as typhoon conditions developed (Typhoon GRACE).

22 July 1950 – At anchor at Pusan, Korea for replenishment of ammunition. 1900 Underway for Sasebo, Japan.

23 July 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan. Majority of ships of the US 7th Fleet and British Far East Fleet present.

24 July 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan for replenishment.

25 July 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan. Commander US Naval FOrces, Far East, Vice-Admiral C.T. Joy, came aboard the MANSFIELD and presented the Bronze Star Medal to four members of the crew for distinguished effort in landing a demolition party from this ship in enemy territory.

kwar1026 July 1950 – Underway from Sasebo, Japan for patrol station off east coast of Korea. 2001 Met with the USS SWENSON at sea and transferred Squadron Commander and mail via small boat for conference and return.

27 July 1950 – On patrol station off east coast of Korea, in company with USS COLLETT, relieved USS DEHAVEN and USS JAMES E. KEYES (DD787) on station. OTC is CTG 96.5 in USS TOLEDO (CA133). 0828 On call from US Army, expended 118 rounds of 5″ AAC shells on targets in YONGDOK area. 1128 Rescued US Air FOrce F-51 pilot from raft after he had bailed out of plane following engine damage after strafing inland target. 2028 On night bombardment mission for the US Army, expended 20 rounds 5″ AAC at targets in vicinity of YONGDOK.

28 July 1950 – On patrol YONGDOK area. 0700 completed all night hourly harassing fire of 6 targets designated by US Army. Expended 135 rounds 5″ AAC and 3 rounds illuminating.

29 July 1950 – On patrol sweep to north coast of Korea. 1400 Expended 60 rounds 5″ AAC shells at railroad junction vicinity of YANGYANG. 1700 Expended 32 rounds at railroad junction, area SAMCHOCK.

30 July 1950 – On patrol off YONGDOK area. 1000 Received US Army liaison officer via high line from USS TOLEDO, proceeded to KOKO DO harbor (off YONGDOK), sent boat ashore and exchanged artillery liaison officer and US Army radio operator. Returned to patrol area and transferred new US Army personnel to USS TOLEDO via high line. 1400 Proceeded as directed by CTG 96.5 to POHANG harbor where debarked via ship’s boat US Air Force pilot previously rescued.

31 July 1950 – On patrol off YONDOK area.

01 August 1950 – On fire support off YONGDOK area, east coast of Korea, in company with USS TOLEDO and USS COLLETT. OTC in CTE 96.51. Directed by US Army ashore to fire 36 rounds 5″ AAC hourly at 9 targets designated as interdiction points north of YONGDOK. 0811 COmpleted night harassing fire, expended 360 rounds 5″ AAC total for night. Average range of ship from beach, 3,000 yards. Target ranges varied from 5,00 to 16,000 yards from ship. 0601 Interrupted fire mission duty to investigate vessel sighted north along coast as directed by OTC. 0650 Identified craft as sampan with 16 South Koreans escaping from ULCHIN to POHANG. 0837 Relieved of fire mission duty by USS TOLEDO and returning to station, screening USS TOLEDO to seaward.

02 August 1950 – On patrol off YONGDOK area, east coast of Korea. 0902 After receipt of mail and passengers via trolley line from USS TOLEDO and USS DEHAVEN the ship was released (with USS COLLETT) from the formation and set course for Sasebo, Japan. 2024 Arrived at Sasebo, Japan for replenishment.

03 August 1950 thru 10 August 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan for replenishment.

11 August 1950 – 0413 Underway from Sasebo, Japan for patrol area. 1314 Rendezvous with units of Task Element 96.51 off YONGDOK. (USS HELENA (CA75), USS CHEVALEIR, USS CHANDLER). Reported to CTE 96.51 for duty. 1949 Assigned fire mission consisting of hourly harassing fire on 8 interdiction points selected by US Army forces ashore, 3 rounds per point, per hour.

12 August 1950 – On gunfire support duty YONGDOK area, east coast of Korea. Conducting hourly night bombardment of 8 targets selected by US Army forces ashore. Targets mainly interdiction points such as road junction, 2 to 4 miles north and west of YONGDOK. 0629 COmpleted night harassing fire, expended 240 rounds 5″ AAC. 0845 On call from US Army, commenced firing on enemy cavalry unit one-mile south of KOKO DO. Expended 4 rounds 5″ AAC. 0900 Relieved of fire mission by two US Air FOrce attack planes. 1310 Directed South Korean FS type cargo vessel to keep clear of KOKO DO which is now in enemy hands. 1520 Detached from duty with TE 96.51 and proceeded to Sasebo, Japan.

13 August 1950 – 0815 Arrived at Sasebo, Japan.

14 August 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan.

15 August 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan. 1819 Underway as unit of Task Element 96.52 in company with USS TOLEDO and DESDIV 91 (less USS DEHAVEN) OTC is COMCRUDIV 5 (CTE 96.52) in USS TOLEDO, COMDESRON 9 in USS MANSFIELD. En route to north east coast of Korea.

16 August 1950 – Underway as before en route to north coast Korea. Positions: 0800 Lat 35° 54’N Long 130°04’E. 1200 Lat 36° 53′ 30″N Long 130°07’30″E. 2000 Lat 38°50’N Long 130°10’45″E.

kwar1517 August 1950 – En route to north Korean coast as before. 0710 On station on seaward beam of USS TOLEDO as she commenced bombardment of coast railway at Lat 40°42’N. 1055 USS SWENSON and USS COLLETT detached from formation to take up patrols at “Point Arthur” and “Point Douglas”. Having been assigned coastal sweep southward, at 1922 fired 32 rounds 5″ AAC at industrial buildings on coast. Observed damage to large railroad building and smoke stack adjoining.

18 August 1950 – Steaming on coastal sweep the east coast of Korea, southbound to YONGDOK area, in company with USS TOLEDO and USS DEHAVEN. 0200-0400 Fired 12 rounds 5″ AAC and 4 rounds 5″ star shells at vehicular traffic along coast road. 0600 Joined TE 96.51 off YONGDOK area. 0830 Transferred mail to USS WILTSIE (DD716) and passengers to USS DEHAVEN via ship’s boat. 0916 Fueled ship alongside USS HELENA. 1122 TE 96.51 departed from area for Sasebo, Japan. Remaining with TE 96.52, USS MANSFIELD assigned screening station ahead of USS TOLEDO. USS DEHAVEN assigned inshore patrol station.

19 August 1950 – On Patrol off POHANG area, east coast of Korea, in company with USS TOLEDO and USS DEHAVEN. 1810 Detached from formation to make patrol sweep of coast to northwest. 2200 to 2400 Expended 6 rounds AAC and 69 rounds 40MM ammunition on vehicle targets on east coast road.

20 August 1950 – On patrol east coast of Korea, making coastal sweep northward. 0311 Fired 6 rounds 5″ AAC and 40 rounds 40MM shells at vehicle lights on coast road. 0800 Rejoined USS TOLEDO and USS DEHAVEN. Fueled ship alongside USS TOLEDO. 0930 Parted company and proceeded north in accordance with orders to assume patrol station at “Point Arthur” Lat 40°50″N Long 136°00’E on north coast of Korea.

21 August 1950 – Effected rendezvous with USS SWENSON at “Point Arthur”. Commanding Officer of the SWENSON came aboard via small boat for conference and return. 2340 Bombarded waterfront docks, railroad and industrial are of JOSHIN, Lat 42°40″N Long 129°14’E at long range (14,000 yards). Expended 168 rounds 5″ AAC, 4 white phosphorus and 9 star shells. Much smoke observed under stars in industrial area.

22 August 1950 – On patrol in the vicinity of “Point Arthur” off the northeast coast of Korea.

23 August 1950 – On patrol off “Point Arthur” 0030 Commenced bombardment of pier heads, railhead, and MITSUBISHI Iron Works in CHOGIN (SEICHIN) at long range (14,000 yards). Expended 180 rounds 5″ AAC. Observed fire 10 miles distant.

24 August 1950 – On patrol vicinity “Point Arthur” 0500 USS DEHAVEN joined. 0700 Joined USS HELENA, USS CHEVALIER and USS HAMMER (DD-718), OTC is CTE 96.51 (COMCRUDIV 5) and CTG 96.5 in USS HELENA. 0815 USS HELENA and USS DEHAVEN commenced fired on railroad targets near JOSHIN (SONGJIN) Korea. 0834 USS MANSFIELD commenced firing on railroad cars as directed by OTC. Expended 161 rounds 5″ AAC and 2 rounds 5″ common. Damaged several gondola type railroad cars, railroad bed and frame buildings. Target located south of JOSHIN. 0929 Ceased fire. 1326 Again directed to fire on similar railroad target selected by OTC with aid of helicopter. Expended 156 rounds 5″ AAC. Damaged railroad coal cars, tracks and buildings with several direct hits, according to air spotter.

25 August 1950 – On patrol off north Korea in company with Task element 96.51. 0800 Detached from formation and directed to destroy railroad cars location south of JOSHIN. 0856 Commenced firing. Expended 66 rounds 5″ AAC and 30 rounds 5″ common. Observed most salvos ere straddles and several direct hits on gondola cars and box cars. One car knocked off tracks. Closed to 3,800 yards range for firing. Location of target same as railroad tunnel mined by demolition party placed ashore by USS MANSFIELD night of 11-12 July. Navigational mark is prominent rock named DOKU GAN. 0920 Ceased fire and rejoined Task Element as ordered by OTC. 1430 Accompanied Task Element of close approach to CHONGIN (SECNIN) for day bombardment of rolling stock. 1449 Bombardment canceled, no targets found by helicopter from USS HELENA. With Task Element proceeded southward at speed of 22 knots.

26 August 1950 – 0700 Rendezvous off POHANG area with TE 96.52 (USS TOLEDO), USS DEHAVEN and USS COLLETT proceeded to Sasebo, Japan, arriving 1800.

27 August 1950 thru 30 August 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan for replenishment.

31 August 1950 – 0204 Underway from Sasebo, Japan for patrol area off POHANG, east coast of Korea, as directed by CTE 96.52. In company with DESDIV 91, OTC COMDESRON 9 in USS MANSFIELD. 1600 Joined TE 96.512 off POHANG. Ships present, USS HELENA, USS DOYLE (DMS34), OTC is CTE 96.51 (COMCRUDIV 3) in USS HELENA. 1711 Received via trolley line form USS HELENA three radio sets for use with US Army forces ashore. 1720 Resumed station in A/S screen around USS HELENA.

01 September 1950 – On patrol off POHANG area, east of Korea, in company with USS HELENA, USS DEHAVEN, USS CHANDLER and USS DOYLE. OTC is CTG 96.5 in USS HELENA 0640 USS TOLEDO joined formation. USS MANSFIELD part of A/S screen about formation. 2000 Relieved USS DEHAVEN as fire mission ship. Directed by US Army forces ashore to fire on eight selected shore targets until 0600 02 September. 2039 Commenced fire on target (shore targets) #1.

02 September 1950 – Fire support ship off POHANG area, east coast of Korea. 0532 Completed firing assigned targets for night harassing mission. 0613 Continued firing harassing fire upon request of US Army forces ashore until 0630, ammunition expended 200 rounds 5″ AAC total for the night. 0812 Recovered message dropped by spotting plane. 0819 Proceeded at maximum speed to point in POHANG harbor to give assistance to pilot of F4U which made a crash landing. 0830 Captain A.E. Phillips USMC of VMTN 516, Marine Air Group 33, pilot crashed F4U, was taken aboard. 0840 Commenced call fire mission at direction of US Army forces ashore. Spotting plane assigned for fire mission. 1122 Completed all fire missions. Expended 217 rounds of 5″ AAC and 3 rounds white phosphorus. 1130 Relieved of fire mission duties by USS DEHAVEN. 1300 Rendezvous with USS TOLEDO for fueling and transfer of Captain A.E. Phillips, USMC, by high line. 1400 Completed fueling and personnel transfer and proceeded north to relieve USS SWENSON on northern patrol. Conducted close in partol of Korean coast en route.

03 September 1950 – On coastal sweep east coast of Korea to relieve USS SWENSON on northern patrol. 0625 Gained USS COLLETT and USS SWENSON. Relieved USS SWENSON detached. USS COLLETT joined and proceeded on northern patrol, OTC is COMDESRON 9 embarked in USS MANSFIELD. 1741 Fired on lookout post east coast of Korea. Lat 40°21’N. Expended 16 rounds of 5″ AAC and 2 5″ VT. Target destroyed.

04 September 1950 – On northern patrol off east coast of Korea. 1220 Opened fire on transformer station Lat 40°25″N. Expended 34 rounds of 5″ AAC, target destroyed. 1448 Opened fire on covered emplacement Lat 40°13’N. Expended 14 rounds of 5″ AAC, target destroyed. 1456 Opened fire on radio mast Lat 40°12’N. Expended 7 rounds 5″ AAC.

05 September 1950 – On northern patrol off east coast of Korea. 0400 Ordered to proceed in company with USS COLLETT on coast sweep south to POHANG area. 1740 Joined USS TOLEDO, USS DEHAVEN and USS DOYLE and took station in A/S screen.

06 September 1950 – On patrol off POHANG area, east coast of Korea. 2000 Relieved USS TOLEDO of fire mission duties. 2126 Commenced firing harassing fire on eight targets assigned by US Army forces ashore.

07 September 1950 – On fire support mission off POHANG, Korea. 0650 Ceased harassing fire. expended 240 rounds 5″ AAC. 0800 Relieved of fire support duties by USS TOLEDO. 0815 Rejoined USS TOLEDO and took station in A/S screen. 1745 USS HELENA, USS BRUSH (DD745), USS MADDOX (DD731), and USS THOMAS (DDR833) joined formation. 1812 Transferred light freight to USS MADDOX. 1920 Ordered by CTG 96.5 to proceed to Sasebo, Japan in company with USS TOLEDO, USS DEHAVEN, and USS COLLETT.

08 September 1950 – Proceeding to Sasebo, Japan in company with USS TOLEDO, USS DEHAVEN, and USS COLLETT. 0720 Arrived Sasebo, Japan. 1050 Underway for Pusan, Korea in accordance with verbal orders of COMDESRON 9. COMDESRON 9 embarked. 1748 Arrived Pusan, Korea. 2215 United Nations Delegation arrived aboard. 2320 US Army Graves Registration Party reported aboard. 2325 US Army Graves Registration Party departed.

09 September 1950 – Anchored Pusan, Korea. 0010 United Nations Delegation reported aboard for transportation to Sasebo, Japan. 0039 Underway for Sasebo, Japan. 0807 Arrived Sasebo, Japan. 0930 UN Delegation left ship.

10 September 1950 thru

11 September 1950 – At Sasebo, Japan for replenishment.

12 September 1950 – 0046 Underway in accordance with COMCRUDIV 5 OpOrd 3-50. En route to Inchon, Korea. 0838 Joined TG 90.6 consisting of USS TOLEDO (COMCRUDIV 5 embarked), HMS KENYA, HMS JAMAICA, USS MANSFIELD (COMDESRON 9 embarked), USS DEHAVEN, USS SWENSON, USS COLLETT, USS GURKE (DD783), USS HENDERSON (DD785). OTC is COMCRUDIV 5 in USS TOLEDO. Formed A/S screen.

kwar1613 September 1950 – Steaming as a unit of TG 90.6 en route to Inchon, Korea. 0540 USS ROCHESTER (CA124) joined formation. 0916 Formed column led by USS MANSFIELD and proceeded up Flying Fish channel toward Inchon, Korea in accordance with CTE OpOrd 14-50. 1125 Exercised at General Quarters. 1145 Sighted 12 mines abeam to port 1,000 yards. Commenced firing on mines with small arms. 1153 Ceased firing on mines. 1227 Cruiser unit commenced bombardment of Inchon, Korea. Anchored in harbor. Adjusted heading at anchor to bring guns to bear. 1302 Commenced firing pre-arranged fire on targets, primarily gun emplacements. 1359 Ceased firing. 1400 Underway proceeding out of harbor at flank speed. 1415 Received counter battery fire from Wolmi-Do, Korea. Returned fire. received no damage. A total of twenty five (25) splashes were observed in the immediate vicinity of which five (5) were close aboard. 1444 Secured from General Quarters. Ammunition expended this date was 170 rounds 0f 5″ AAC, 6 rounds of 5″ common, and 320 rounds of 40MM projectiles. 1545 Rejoined TG 90.6. Formed A/S screen.

kwar1714 September 1950 – Steaming as a unit of TG 90.6 off west coast of Korea. 0800 Hove to in company with TG 90.6 paying tribute to LTJG Swenson, USN, who was killed aboard the USS SWENSON in action, 13 September 1950. 0906 Formed column and proceeded up Flying Fish channel to Inchon area. USS MANSFIELD column leader of the Destroyer unit. 1140 Cruiser Element commenced bombardment of Inchon area. 1150 Exercised at General Quarters. 1210 Cruiser Element ceased firing. 1212 Air strike in progress on Wolmi-Do and Inchon area. 1254 On station assigned for pre-arranged fire. 1256 Commenced firing pre-arranged fire on targets in Inchon area. 1416 Ceased firing having expended 154 rounds 5″ AAC, and 950 rounds 40MM projectiles. Proceeding down Flying Fish channel. 1503 Secured from General Quarters. 1735 Rejoined TG 90.6 Formed A/S screen.

kwar1815 September 1950 – Steaming as a unit of TG 90.6 0017 TE 90.67 (MANSFIELD, DEHAVEN, SWENSON, COLLETT, HENDERSON, GURKE) OTC is COMDESRON 9 in USS MANSFIELD detached to proceed on duty assigned. 0135 USS SOUTHERLAND (DDR743) joined column to replace USS COLLETT which had received hull damage during action on 13 September 1950. Proceeding up Flying Fish channel to bombardment station for pre-arranged fire. 0344 Exercised at General Quarters. 0436 Anchored in assigned berth Inchon, Ko, Korea. 0540 Commenced firing pre-arranged fire on Inchon area. 0628 Checked fire. 0635 First landing wave arrived on Wolmi-Do. 0647 Second landing wave arrived on beach. 0651 Third landing wave arrived on beach. 0709 Wolmi-Do reported secured. 0801 Commenced call fire assignments in Inchon area for landing in city of Inchon. 1725 Ceased pre-arranged fire. 1732 First wave arrived Inchon. 1735. Second wave arrived Inchon. 1823 Assigned call fire mission various targets. 1953 Secured from General Quarters. Continuing call fire using condition watches. Ammunition expended this date: 592 rounds of 5″ AAC, 1281 rounds 40MM projectiles. Positins: 0800-1200-2000 at Inchon, Ko, Korea.

kwar1916 September 1950 – Anchored Inchon, Ko, Korea, as a unit of TG 90.6 on call fire duty. 1338 Commenced firing as directed by SFCP. 1348 Ceased firing having expended 6 rounds of 5″ AAC. 2020 Commenced night illumination at direction SFCP.

17 September 1950 – Anchored Inchon, Ko, Korea as a unit of TG 90.6 on call fire duty. 0500 Completed firing night illumination having expended 50 rounds of 5″ Star shells. 0604 Exercised at General Quarters due to “Flash Red-Control Yellow”. 0656 Commenced firing as directed SFCP on enemy troops. 0657 Ceased firing. Mission assumed by aircraft in area. Expended 2 rounds of 5″ AAC. 0715 “Flash White”, secured from General Quarters. 1235 Commenced firing as directed by SFCP. 1255Ceased firing having expended 4 rounds of VT 5″ projectiles. 1731 Underway for replenishment in accordance with CTE 90.62 msg 171701I. 2216 Completed replenishment of ammunition from USS HEWELL (AKL14) having received 672 rounds of 5″ AAC. Proceeding to USS NAVASOTA (AO107), for fuel.

18 September 1950 – Replenishing fuel from USS NAVASOTA as a unit of TG 90.6. 0007 Completed fueling having received 78,422 gallons of navy special fuel. Replenishment completed. Underway for assigned anchorage on call fire duty in Inchon, Ko, Korea. Positions 0800-1200-2000 Anchored and underway as directed in Inchon, Ko, Korea.

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ship0519 September 1950 – Anchored in Inchon, Ko, Korea as a unit of TG 90.6 on call fire duty as directed by SFCP. 0408 Underway in accordance with CTE 90.62 msg 182210I. 1633 USS MISSOURI (BB63) joined units of TG 90.6. USS MANSFIELD escorting USS MISSOURI up Flying Fish Channel, to assigned anchorage. 2010 Anchored in Flying Fish channel. Conducting sonar sweep at anchor. Positions: 0800-1200-2000 Underway and anchored as directed in Inchon, Ko, Korea.

20 September 1950– Anchored in Inchon, Ko, Korea as a unit of TG 90.6 in company with USS MISSOURI. 1030 Underway in company with USS MISSOURI proceeding to assigned anchorage vicinity Inchon, Korea. Delivered mail, freight and passengers to various ships present. Positions: 0800-1200-2000 Anchored and underway as directed Inchon Ko, Korea.

21 September 1950 – Anchored Inchon, Ko, Korea, near Yodolmi Do Island as a unit of TG 90.6 in air defense station. Positions: 0800-1200-2000 Anchored Inchon, KO, Korea.

22 September 1950 – Underway and anchored in Flying Fish Channel, Inchon, Ko, Korea as a unit of TG 90.6, and as directed by CTG 90.6 and CTE 90.62. Positions: 0800-1200-2000 Underway and anchored.

ship0623 September 1950 – Anchored Inchon, Ko, Korea in air defense station. 1053 In accordance with CTG 90.6 order, underway in company with USS SWENSON and USS DEHAVEN in column open order en route to Sasebo, Japan for replenishment. OTC in this ship. In accordance with ComSeventhFlt 222354I of September 1950, the new unit designation is as follows: USS MANSFIELD a unit of Destroyer Squadron NINE, under operation control of CTF 95.

24 September 1950 – Underway in company with USS DEHAVEN and USS SWENSON, en route to Sasebo, Japan. 1830 Arrived Sasebo, Japan. Commenced replenishment.

25 September 1950 – Moored starboard side to USS SWENSON at Buoy #4, Sasebo, Japan. Ships Present: various unites of the United Nations Fleet. SOPA is ComServDiv-31 in USS JASON (ARH1).

26 September 1950 – Moored starboard side to USS SWENSON at Buoy #4, Sasebo, Japan. 1235 ComDesRon NINE left the ship en route to USNH Yokosuka, Japan. 1725 Underway for the east coast of Korea, pursuant to CTG 95.2 msg 260522Z of September 1950, in company with USS HELENA and USS SWENSON. 1900 FOrmed bent line screen #12 with USS HELENA as guide. OTC in USS HELENA. THis ship in station #1.

27 September 1950 – Steaming en route to east coast of Korea, in company with USS HELENA (Guide and OTC) and USS SWENSON in bent line screen #12. This ship in station #1. 0725 Sighted USS MOORE (DD-747). 0943 Sighted USS WORCHESTER (CL144), in company with USS DEHAVEN and USS BRUSH. 1010 FOrmed bent line screen #13, USS BRUSH as guide. This ship in station #2. 1115 USS SWENSON proceeded alongside USS WORCHESTER. 1140 ALl transfers completed this ship taking station #2 in bent line screen #13. 1348 USS WORCHESTER accompanied by USS DEHAVEN and USS BRUSH left formation. Took station #2, bent line screen #12, with USS HELENA as guide. 1456 Proceeding independently to patrol station Lat 37°32’N Long 129°10’E. 2008 Commenced interdiction fire on four (4) targets in accordance with CTG 95.2 dispatch 260522Z. 2030 Completed firing, 20 rounds of 5″ AAC expended. 2148 Again took targets under fire. 2222 Completed firing, 20 rounds of 5″ AAC expended. 2252 Again took targets under fire. 2326 Completed firing, 20 rounds of 5″ AAC AAC expended. 2338 Fired on star shell over target #4. Total rounds expended, eighty (80) rounds of 5″ AAC and one (1) rounds of star shells.

28 September 1950 – On fire support duty off east coast of Korea. In company with USS SWENSON. Commenced interdiction fire various targets. 0027 Ceased firing having expended 20 rounds 5″ AAC. 0618 USS SWENSON departed for patrol south of Lat 37°32’N Long 129°10’E. USS MANSFIELD patrolling north. 0855 USS SWENSON departed to join USS HELENA for sweep north. 1142 Spoke to South Korea fishing vessel and was informed the North Korean troops had departed SAMCHOK previous night. 1403 Proceeded to Lat 37°50’N Long 128°54’E for patrol. 1530 rejoined by USS SWENSON.

29 September 1950 – Patrolling in company with USS SWENSON off the east coast of Korea. 0103 Changed stations to assume fire mission duty. 0130 Commenced harassing fire. 0534 Ceased firing having expended 120 rounds of 5″ AAC, illuminating. 0600 Assumed south patrol and USS SWENSON north patrol from a point at Lat 37°50’N Long 128°54’E, outside 50 fathom curve.

ship0730 September 1950 – Patrolling in company with USS SWENSON off the east coast of Korea. 0428 COmmenced firing star shells over CHUMON SHIN. 0458 Completed firing having expended 5 star shells. 1227 Proceeding in company with USS SWENSON Lat 38°45’N Long 128°15’E. As directed by CTG 95.2 to investigate a reported downed B-26. 1445 Exercised at General Quarters. 1504 Arrived designated area and commenced search. SAR plane overhead. USS SWENSON standing by outside the fifty fathom line. 1547 Explosion port side forward. Ship’s position: Gocho Tan lighthouse bearing 248 T, distance 2,500 yards. All engines back full to clear the area. 1737 Proceeding slowly southward outside the fifty fathom curve. Battle damage, casualties and other pertinent material are included in he action report of this encounter. 2037 USS HELENA took station to receive the wounded. Positions: 0800 Lat 36°20’N Long 129°12’E. 1200 Lat 37°01’N Long 128°58’E. 2000 Lat 38°N Long 129°25’E.

For more on MINE Explosion please go here .

Report from onboard FMS LA GRANDIERE go here .